Gummi Bears

I’m spread pretty thin between projects, but wanted to post some new renderings. One of the benefits of Fusion 360 is the materials customization built into their rendering pipeline. And I think this project does a good job of highlighting this feature.

I’m kicking myself for not rendering at a higher resolution, but this lighting test did a fantastic job of demonstrating refraction with a slightly rough surface.

I’m kicking myself for not rendering at a higher resolution, but this lighting test did a fantastic job of demonstrating refraction with a slightly rough surface.

While the angle and lighting are more traditional (i.e., less creative) for a rendering shot, I’m including it because of the shadows and light transmittance between materials. This is the kind of thing that only looks convincing with ray tracing. Raster engines cannot accurately simulate light passing and reflecting off of materials like this.

While the angle and lighting are more traditional (i.e., less creative) for a rendering shot, I’m including it because of the shadows and light transmittance between materials. This is the kind of thing that only looks convincing with ray tracing. Raster engines cannot accurately simulate light passing and reflecting off of materials like this.

I have a render running in the cloud right now for a scene with roughly 250 of these gummies piled on top of one another. With so many surfaces and ray transformations and generations coming from such a complex model, I cannot render it to useable resolutions locally. You can see the rest of my renderings and download the models for yourself on GrabCad.

Mac Mini 2018 in Fusion 360

This month cruised by fast. I have been spending the bulk of my time in Fusion 360, both for class projects, as well as personal exploration of the software. Here are some recent renderings:

Apple updated the Mac Mini last month, adding an optional 6-core Intel Coffee Lake (Core i7 8700B) processor configuration, Thunderbolt 3 (USB Type C interface), and a “Space Gray” makeover. using photos from Apple’s product page, I reconstructed the IO layout and customized material and appearance settings.  You can download my model here.

Apple updated the Mac Mini last month, adding an optional 6-core Intel Coffee Lake (Core i7 8700B) processor configuration, Thunderbolt 3 (USB Type C interface), and a “Space Gray” makeover. using photos from Apple’s product page, I reconstructed the IO layout and customized material and appearance settings. You can download my model here.

Opposite angle, to show off that sweet white LED!

Opposite angle, to show off that sweet white LED!

For anyone getting into CAD, I also recommend GrabCAD.com, where you can download (and contribute) 3D models for free! I was able to accelerate my workflow by downloading prebuilt models of the ethernet, USB, and HDMI ports.